Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) Quiz


Childhood experiences, both positive and negative, have a tremendous impact on future violence victimization and perpetration, and lifelong health and opportunity. As such, early experiences are an important public health issue. Much of the foundational research in this area has been referred to as Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs).

There are 10 types of childhood trauma measured in the ACE Study. Five are personal — physical abuse, verbal abuse, sexual abuse, physical neglect, and emotional neglect. Five are related to other family members: a parent who’s an alcoholic, a mother who’s a victim of domestic violence, a family member in jail, a family member diagnosed with a mental illness, and the disappearance of a parent through divorce, death or abandonment. Each type of trauma counts as one. So a person who’s been physically abused, with one alcoholic parent, and a mother who was beaten up has an ACE score of three.

According to the research, the higher the score, the higher a person’s risk of adverse health outcomes, including substance use disorders and addiction. Remember this, too: ACE scores don’t tally the positive experiences in early life that can help build resilience and protect a child from the effects of trauma. Having a grandparent who loves you, a teacher who understands and believes in you, or a trusted friend you can confide in may mitigate the long-term effects of early trauma, psychologists say.

Page credits:
Danny DeBelius/NPR
Aces Too High
How Facing Aces Makes Us Happier…

Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Association
National Institute of Health
National Public Radio
Dr. Nadine Burke Harris: How Childhood Trauma Affects Health Across A Lifetime on TedMed